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Scientific Journal of the Hellenic Companion Animal Veterinary Society (HCAVS)

 

Hellenic Journal of Companion Animal Medicine - Volume 3 - Issue 2 - 2014

Table of Contents

  • Bullet32 3
    Editorial
  • Bullet32 1
    Canine granulocytic anaplasmosis in Europe
  • Bullet32 8
    Current views regarding hiatal hernia in dogs and cats
  • Bullet32 2
    Pleural cavity puncture (Thoracocentisis) in the dog
  • Bullet32 7
    Thoracostomy tube placement
  • Bullet32 6
    Instructions for authors

 

Editorial

As we cordially launched the sixth issue of Hellenic Journal of Companion Animal Medicine, our strong, initial desire was to build a high quality Journal that would be regarded as indispensable to those actively engaged in Small Animal clinical work. This current issue is considered to be a turning point in the journal’s entity. With the aim of introducing this exciting initiative to the target audience of Greek veterinary practitioners, the first five issues were distributed for free to the headcount of veterinarians in the country interested in Small Animal clinical practice. Commencing with this issue, the journal will now only be received by members of HCAVS (as a benefit of membership), as well as by subscribers.

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Current views regarding hiatal hernia in dogs and cats

> Abstract
Τhe cause and pathophysiology of hiatal hernia are not yet fully understood, but hiatal hernia seldom appears in dogs and is rarer in cats. Sliding hiatal hernia is the most common type to present in clinical practice. Chinese Shar-Pei dogs are predisposed to the development of this type of hernia. The majority of clinical signs are due to gastroesophageal reflux. Diagnosis is based on diagnostic imaging, and esophagoscopy may provide useful information. It can be managed medically and surgically. The aim of surgical treatment is the anatomical repair and stabilization of the hernia. Prognosis for patients with hiatal hernia is usually favorable.

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Time for diagnostics...

Remember how...

Thoracostomy tube placement

Thoracostomy tube placement is commonly indicated in cases of recurrent pneumothorax or pleural effusions, as well as after thoracic surgery when fluid or air drainage is needed. Tube insertion is usually performed when repeated thoracentesis is required to drain the pleural space; the ultimate goal is the restoration of pleural subatmospheric pressure.

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Canine granulocytic anaplasmosis in Europe:

an emerging tick-borne infectious disease

> Abstract
Anaplasma phagocytophilum, an intracellular, gram-negative aerobic bacterium, is the cause for granulocytic anaplasmosis in people, horses, dogs, cats, wolves, cattle and small ruminants. A. phagocytophilum mainly targets neutrophils and rarely eosinophilic granulocytes; in Europe it is transmitted by the tick Ixodes ricinus. A significant number of small mammals and deer comprise the reservoir for the microorganism in the wild. The majority of infected dogs remain asymptomatic, whereas those that develop clinical signs mostly present with non-specific signs like fever, depression or lethargy, anorexia and lameness. The most common laboratory finding of anaplasmosis is thrombocytopenia. Diagnosis is based on finding aggregates of the organism (morulae) in the cytoplasm of neutrophils, serological detection of specific antibodies and polymerase chain reaction. The treatment of choice is Doxycycline, administered per os at a dose of 5 mg/kg Β.W./12 hours for 2-4 weeks.

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Time for diagnostics...

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....Pleural cavity puncture (Thoracocentisis) in the dog

> Anatomy – physiology
Pleura is the organ that covers the inner surface of the thoracic cavity wall and the outer surface of the lungs. It consists of the perietal and visceral pleurae between which a thin cavity is formed, called the pleural cavity. In a healthy dog this cavity is slit in shape and contains only a small amount of fluid which ranges from 1.5ml to 4.0ml. Pleural fluid is produced constantly by the vessels of the organ but it is also constantly reabsorbed by the lymphatic system thus its volume remains within the previously mentioned quantities. Protein concentration in the fluid as well as cell count is practically zero. Pleural fluid aims to allow the two pleurae to slide effortlessly against each other during ventilation. In each hemithorax the pleural cavity can be independent or may communicate at the point of the anterior mediastinal space with the opposite one.

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Instructions for authors

The Hellenic Journal of Companion Animal Medicine (H.J.C.A.M.) is a peer-reviewed, bilingual (Greek and English), publication of the Hellenic Companion Animal Veterinary Society (H.C.A.V.S.), which aims at the continuing education of the companion animal practitioners.

Manuscripts should be submitted for review, with the consent that they have not been submitted simultaneously or published in part or in full, to other journals.

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