hjcam logo

Scientific Journal of the Hellenic Companion Animal Veterinary Society (HCAVS)

 

Hellenic Journal of Companion Animal Medicine - Volume 3 - Issue 1 - 2014

Table of Contents

  • Bullet31 1
    Editorial
  • Bullet31 2
    Update on the diagnosis and therapy of canine cruciate ligament rupture
  • Bullet31 4
    Obesity in dogs and cats: Discovering the enemy
  • Bullet31 6
    Spirocerca lupi-associated pyothorax in two dogs
  • Bullet31 7
    Errata
  • Bullet31 11
    Instructions for authors

 

Editorial

The primary and maybe excellent to be emphasized and highlighted for this issue of our scientific journal «Hellenic Journal of Companion Animal Medicine” is what was used to be stated as Stakhanovism mood - intention. This has its own significance, as people working for this scientific Journal, do not generally waste their time but they create, they produce thoughts and they contribute to the scientific development without any financial reward!

I would personally like to congratulate the Editor-in-Chief, Mrs. Katerina Adamama-Moraitou, Associate Professor, AUTh, the Co-Editor Dimitra Pardali, DVM, PhD and all the editorial board members.

Continue Reading

Obesity in dogs and cats: Discovering the enemy

> Abstract
Obesity ranks as the most common nutritional disorder reaching epidemic proportions among dogs and cats, at least in the developed world. Caused by energy intake exceeding energy loss, it results in adipose tissue accumulation in the organism negatively affecting an individual’s health. The list of hormones, neurotransmitters and substances secreted by adipose tissue itself, proven to have an active part in body weight modulation, is extensive. Predisposing factors contributing to the appearance of this disease include age, gender, breed and living conditions. The most common conditions to be associated with obesity are osteoarthritis, diseases of the cardiovascular and respiratory system, hypertension, hepatic lipidosis and type II diabetes mellitus. The evaluation and grading of obesity is based on the findings of observation and palpation of the animal, taking into consideration the predefined guidelines. The aim of any treatment plan applied in obesity management is the reduction of energy input and increase in output. This is mainly accomplished by reducing daily consumed calories and increasing physical activity. A fundamental requirement for successful management is that the owner understands the animal’s problem and is willing to cooperate with their veterinarian on a long-term basis. Finally, re-evaluation of body weight should occur at monthly intervals so that the dietary plan can be adjusted accordingly.

Continue Reading

Update on the diagnosis and therapy of canine cruciate ligament rupture

> Abstract
Rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament is one of the most common canine orthopedic disorders, usually caused by progressive degeneration of unknown etiology. Rarely, it can be caused by trauma, similar to that which occurs in people. Diagnosing this condition requires a detailed history, observation of the dog and physical examination of the stifle joint. Two orthopedic examinations are mandatory: the cranial “drawer” sign and the tibial compression test. Radiographic evaluation of the stifle joint must always be included to differentiate it from other pathological conditions and, also, to receive information regarding the acute or chronic nature of the rupture. Treatment for cranial cruciate ligament rupture can be either conservative or surgical. A number of surgical techniques have been previously described in the literature; however, no study has yet conclusively proven that a single technique is better than any other. Because of this fact, technique selection has been a matter of debate among orthopedic veterinary surgeons.

Continue Reading

Spirocerca lupi-associated pyothorax in two dogs

> ABSTRACT
Spirocerca lupi infection is an uncommon cause of pyothorax in the dog. In the present report, two cases of canine spirocercosis-associated pyothorax are described. Both cases demonstrated historical or clinical evidence of esophageal dysphagia, manifested as odynophagia and/or regurgitation, and one showed clinical findings suggestive of pleural effusion such as weakness, depression and muffled heart sounds. Thoracic radiography in the first case revealed pleural effusion and soft tissue opacity located at the caudodorsal aspect of the mediastinum, while S. lupi ova were found in fecal examination of both dogs. The first dog was euthanized at his owner’s request, while the second died suddenly during hospitalization. The definitive association between spirocercosis and pyothorax was established post mortem. These cases emphasize the importance of considering esophageal spirocercosis as a cause of canine pyothorax in highly endemic areas.

Continue Reading

Instructions for authors

The Hellenic Journal of Companion Animal Medicine (H.J.C.A.M.) is a peer-reviewed, bilingual (Greek and English), publication of the Hellenic Companion Animal Veterinary Society (H.C.A.V.S.), which aims at the continuing education of the companion animal practitioners.

Manuscripts should be submitted for review, with the consent that they have not been submitted simultaneously or published in part or in full, to other journals.

Continue Reading

Quick Links

Contact us

Hellenic Journal of
Companion Animal Medicine

Apollo Tower
64 Louise Riencourt Street,
115 23 Athens
Tel.: +30 210 7759727
Fax.: +30 210 7753460

Sponsor

 
diagnovet