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Scientific Journal of the Hellenic Companion Animal Veterinary Society (HCAVS)

 

Hellenic Journal of Companion Animal Medicine - Volume 2 - Issue 1 - 2013

Table of Contents

  • Bullet01
    White Line Disease: Retrospective study of 56 cases
  • Bullet02
    Dermatologic emergencies in the dog and the cat
  • Bullet03
    Vaginal smear cytological examination of the bitch
  • Bullet04
    Jugular vein catheter placement
    Indications & technique
  • Bullet10
    Instructions for authors

 

White Line Disease:

Retrospective study of 56 cases

> Abstract
White Line Disease (W.L.D.) refers to hoof wall separation at the junction between the stratum medium and stratum internum of the epidermis that subsequently forms a cavity. This study included 56 horses with W.L.D. that were admitted to the Equine Unit, Companion Animal Clinic, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki over the last 3 years. The cause of W.L.D. has been attributed to incorrect hot shoeing (overheated-dried out hoof) in 18 horses, overhydration of the hoof in 10 horses, dehydration of the hoof due to environmental factors in 6 horses, improper shoeing (“nail bind”- small or inappropriate horseshoe, contamination of nail holes) in 8 horses and combination of the above in 6 horses.

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Vaginal smear cytological examination of the bitch

The vaginal smear cytological examination may be used to distinguish the stages of the ovarian cycle and to assist diagnosis of various genital system disorders. The vaginal cytological findings are evaluated always in combination with reproductive history data, genital system clinical findings (abdominal palpation, vaginoscopy, vaginal palpation) and when necessary, in combination with findings of genital system diagnostic imaging (ultrasonograpy and x-ray) and hormonal estimations.

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Instructions for authors

The Hellenic Journal of Companion Animal Medicine (H.J.C.A.M.) is a peer-reviewed, bilingual (Greek and English), publication of the Hellenic Companion Animal Veterinary Society (H.C.A.V.S.), which aims at the continuing education of the companion animal practitioners.

Manuscripts should be submitted for review, with the consent that they have not been submitted simultaneously or published in part or in full, to other journals.

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Dermatologic emergencies in the dog and the cat

> Abstract
Dermatologic emergencies are rare in clinical practice and most commonly have an acute onset. A canine or feline skin disease can become life-threatening because of sepsis and toxemia, loss of fluids, protein, and electrolytes and the simultaneous involvement of vital internal organs. Emergency skin diseases include bacterial cellulitis in dogs, necrotizing fasciitis in dogs and cats, toxic shock syndrome in dogs, subcutaneous and systemic fungal infections in dogs and cats, angioedema in dogs and cats, autoimmune skin diseases with extensive ulceration in dogs and cats, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in dogs and cats, vasculitis in dogs and cats, sterile postural erythroderma (superficial suppurative necrolytic dermatitis) of miniature Schnauzers, sulfonamide hypersensitivity syndrome in dogs, and sterile neutrophilic dermatosis (subcorneal and follicular neutrophilic pustular dermatitis or Sweet’s syndrome) in dogs.

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Jugular vein catheter placement
Indications & technique

Indications

Jugular vein catheter (JVC) placement in the dog is a relatively quick and easy to be performed procedure that does not demand sedation of the animal, although the presence of a veterinary nurse is deemed necessary. Various catheter types that are appropriate for jugular vein catheterization are available in the market. Catheters designed for humans can also be used. Jugular vein catheters are categorized according to the number of channels that they have (signlechanneled, double-channeled, triple-channeled), their length (6 to 18 cm) and their diameter (14 to 20 gauge).

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